OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Fellowship Program

OSU Resident Research Fellowship Program

Each year, the Center for the Humanities awards six to eight fellowships in support of research professionals at OSU. The fellowship awards are open to scholars working in traditional humanities disciplines and scholars working on projects in the social and natural sciences that demonstrably engage in humanistic inquiry, addressing questions of interpretation, communication, or criticism.

Resident Research Fellows receive release time for two courses and an office and administrative support in the Autzen House for the entire academic year. Fellows contribute to interdisciplinary intellectual life at Oregon State by participating in the Center’s public lecture series and other programs.

The Center supports a diverse and inclusive vision of the humanities. The fundamental mission of all Center programs is to enhance the vitality and promote the excellence of humanities research and teaching at Oregon State University.

The deadline for 2018-2019 applications is Thursday, December 7th, 2017.

OSU Fellowship Application (PDF) (Word)

To submit, please email a signed, scanned pdf of your completed application to centerforthehumanities@oregonstate.edu. Applicants are encouraged to request signatures one week before submission deadline.

EVALUATION CRITERIA FOR FELLOWSHIPS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:

Does the applicant clearly define the subject of study, the problem at issue within this subject, and present an appropriate method of carrying out this study within the proposed award period?

Is the expected outcome of this proposal made clear, i.e., the publication and/or other presentations of the results of study?

What is the probability that this award will prove successful in enabling the applicant to achieve those results?

Does this proposal lie within the bounds of the humanities as defined above?

What is the intervention this project aims to make? Does the proposal present a convincing case for the significance of this intervention and this study?

Does the proposed study contribute to a diverse and inclusive vision of the humanities?